Spanish Metrification
By 
A. Robert Lauer
arlauer@ou.edu
Mission Statement:
To enable students of Spanish Lyric Poetry to understand its formal and unique structure 
 
Contents:
 
canción
canción paralelística
copla
copla real
cuaderna vía
cuarteto
décima
glosa
letrilla
lira
madrigal
octava real
quintilla
redondilla
romance
romancillo
seguidilla 
silva
soneto 
tercetos
verso suelto 
verso pareado
villancico
zéjel

End

 
SPANISH POETIC METERS:

     Unlike English poetry, which measures poetic lines by metric feet, Spanish (like French and Italian) poetry measures poetic lines ("verses") by syllables.  Hence, poetic lines may be: 

  • Monosyllabic (consisting one one syllable)
  • Bisyllabic (consisting of two syllables)
  • Trisyllabic (consisting of three syllables)
  • Tetrasyllabic (consisting of four syllables)
  • Hexasyllabic (consisting of six syllables).  The second Spanish national meter.
  • Heptasyllabic (consisting of seven syllables).  Of Italian origin.
  • Octosyllabic (consisting of eight syllables).  The Spanish national meter.
  • «Eneasílabo» (consisting of nine syllables).
  • Decasyllabic (consisting of ten syllables)
  • Hendecasyllabic (consisting of eleven syllables).  Of Italian origin.
  • Dodecasyllabic (consisting of twelve syllables).  Of French origin.
  • «Tridecasílabo» (consisting of thirteen syllable).
  • Tetradecasyllabic (consisting of 14 syllables).  Clerical poetry only (clerecía).
  • «Pentadecasílabo» (consisting of 15 syllabless).
  • «Octonario» (consisting of 16 syllables).
     The "national" meter in Spanish is the octosyllable (like the iambic pentameter is the English "national" meter).  It is also called the "romance" (or ballad) meter.  A shorter form of the "romance," called "romancillo," is hexasyllabic (six-syllables long) and is also "national."  Those two meters are in effect the most "Spanish."  The French national meter, the Alexandrine  (consisting, in French, of 12-syllable long lines) is also used in Spanish clerical poetry (called mester de clerecía poetry), and, on occasion, for Modernist effects, although in Spanish it is tetradecasyllabic (14-syllables long) instead of dodecasyllabic (12-syllables long).  During the Renaissance, Italian meters were imported into Spanish, basically heptasyllables (7-syllables long) and hendecasyllables (11-syllables long).   And that's it.  Basically, the most important meters to remember are octosyllables (8), hexasyllables (6), heptasyllables (7), hendecasyllables(11), and alejandrinos or tetradecasyllables (14).  The other meters are used less often, although they certainly appear in early mester de juglaría poetry and even in the Romantic period..

 
 
SPANISH POETIC STRESSES:

All poetic lines in Spanish must stress at least one of the following syllables: 
 
The penultimate (or second to last) syllable: ------'
The last (or final) syllable: -------
The antepenultimate (or third to last) syllable: -----'--



     In Spanish poetry, the "normal" poetic stress falls on the penult.  This is also called the paroxytone.  Other names for this stress are: verso llano, acento grave, or rima femenina.
 
 
Verso llano (paroxytonic):
«No te desconsueles, hija»
 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
«No
te 
des-
con-
sue-
les, 
hi-
ja»
 


     However, a poetic line may end on an acute (final) syllable.  This is called an oxytonic stress, rima aguda, or rima masculina.   But, as already stated, ALL poetic lines in Spanish MUST end on the penultimate syllable.  Hence, if a verse ends on an acento agudo, you must count an extra syllable even if it is not there.  Hence, the following verse, although containing only 7 syllables, is an octosyllabic verse because it ends acutely, or oxytonically
 
 
Verso agudo (oxytonic):
«es de Medina la flor»
 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
«es
de
Me-
di-
na
la
flor»
Ø


     Likewise, if the poetic line ends on the antepenultimate syllable, or proparoxytonically, one must  "delete" or count a syllable less.  Hence, the line below has 9 syllables, but since the stress is proparoxytonic, the line counts poetically as an octosyllable: 
 
 
Verso esdrújulo (proparoxytonic):
«que en nuestra provincia tica»
 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
 Ø
8
«que_en
nues-
tra
pro-
vin-
cia
-
ti-
ca»
 
SPANISH POETIC LICENCE DEVICES:

     Of course, even with the above poetic licenses, it is still hard to get the right number of syllables per line.  Not to worry.  Spanish is flexible enough to allow four poetic license devices to get the "right" number of syllables per line.  These are the following: 

  • Syneresis (Sp. sinéresis). The means by which you combine diphthongs that are usually not combined, thus giving you "less" syllables than would be the case:  e.g., «lealtad», a three-syllable word (le-al-tad) is pronounced as a two-syllable word (leal-tad).  In this case, the /e/ sounds almost like an /i/ (lial-tad).  In a word like «toalla» (to-a-lla), by means of syneresis (toa-lla), the /o/ would sound almost like an /u/ (tua-lla).
  • Synaloepha (Sp. sinalefa).  This is a very common practice even in normal speech, wherein vowel sounds are "joined" (or collapsed)  at the end or beginning of verses: For instance, the line «adonde_escondido_estaba» has 10 grammatical syllables (a-don-de-es-con-di-do-es-ta-ba),  but poetically it is an octosyllabic verse (it has 8 poetic syllables instead of 10) because of the union between the final /e/ of adonde with the beginning /e/ of escondido, and because of the "collapse" of the final /o/ of escondido with the beginning /e/ of estaba).
  • Dieresis (Sp. diéresis):  This is the means by which to "lengthen" a poetic line, usually by emphasizing a semivowel like an /i/ by placing an umlaut on it.  Hence, if you ever see a word like «confiado» (a three-syllable word [con/fia/do])  with an umlaut on the /ï/, the poet wishes you to stress that /i/, as if it formed an independent syllable.  Thusly, «confïado» would be read as if it were four-syllables long (con/fï/a/do).
  • Hiatus (Sp. hiato [pausa]):  This is the means by which you avoid a synaloepha and actually pause between vowels at the beginning or end of a word, without collapsing them (for emphasis).  Hence, «que se haga»  can be read as if it were a tetrasyllabic verse by refusing to collapse the final /e/ of se with the /a/ sound of haga (/que-se-ha-ga/ instead of /que-se_ha-ga/).
 
SPANISH POETIC RHYMES (rima): 

In Spanish poetry, there are two types of rhyme (although in the modern period the tendency is not to rhyme [to use blank verse]): 

  • Consonant rhymerima consonante») or "full rhyme," when all the poetic lines rhyme with each other (the rhyme begins to be counted with the last stressed vowel, a consonant, and, if any, the last unstressed vowel (as in «[. . . ] hada / [. . .] nada»); this is expressed by means of a scansion [escansión]: abba, ABABABCC, etc.); and
  • Assonant rhyme rima asonante») or "half rhyme," when  only the last stressed vowel  (and, if any, a second, unstressed vowel) rhymes with every other even-numbered line (versos pares), leaving the odd-numbered (versos impares) lines unrhymed.  Also, only strong vowels (a, e, o, í, ú) count as vowel rhymes; weak vowels (unaccented i or u) in diphthongs are ignored.  Hence, a word like «iglesia» rhymes with «fuerza» only as  far as the /e/ and the /a/ are concerned (the /i/ of iglesia is ignored).  Likewise, in the case of a proparoxytonic verse, only the penult (the last stressed vowel) and the last unstressed vowel rhyme.  Hence, «espléndido» rhymes with «menos» (e, o/ e, o) [the /i/ of espléndido is not counted).
 
SPANISH POETIC RHYTHMS(ritmo):  The musicality of the verse: 


HEXASYLLABLES (hexasílabos) have the following musical patterns: 
 
Trocaico: / '- '- '- /: «Ya se acerca el
Dactílico: / - '-- '- /: «Dominio es la tierra»
Polirrítmico: / '- --'- /
/ -'- -' / 
/ '-- -'- /
/ '- - - ' /
«Linda zagaleja 
de cuerpo gentil
muérome de amores 
desde que te vi»


OCTOSYLLABLES (octosílabos) have the following musical rhythm: 
 
Trocaico: / '- '- '- '- /: «Virgen madre, casta esposa»
Dactílico: / '-- '-- '- /: «Es un estrecho camino»
Mixto A: / - '- '-- '- /: «Se acerca grancabalgada»
Mixto B: / ' '-- '- '- /: «Calzadas espuelas de oro»

HEPTASYLLABLES (heptasílabos) exhibit the following melodic patterns: 
 
Trocaico: / - '- '- '- /: «Quese el penitente»
Dactílico: / -- '-- '- /: «Ajustada a la sola»
Mixto: / '-- '- '- /: «Madre del alma


HENDECASYLLABLES (endecasílabos) have the following rhythm: 
 
Enfático (1, 6, 10): / '---- '--- '- /: «Eres la primavera verdadera»
Heroico (yámbico) [2, 6, 10]: / - '--- '--- '- /: «Aquella voluntadhonesta y pura»
Melódico (3, 6, 10): / -- ' -- '--- '- /: «Y en reposo silente sobre el ara»
Sáfico (4, 8, 10): / --- ' --- '- '- /: «Dulce vecina de la verde selva»
Dactílico (anapéstico) [4, 7, 10]: / --- '-- '-- '- /: «Libre la frente que el casco rehusa» 
Galaico antiguo (5, 10): / ----'----'- /: «Cosas misteriosas, trágicas, raras»
Endecasílabo a la francesa (4, 6, 10): (4 [acute], 6 or 8, 10): «No, no das consuelo a mi quebranto»
Polirrítmico: Any combination of the first four


ALEXANDRINES (tetradecasilabos) may be: 
 
Trochaic (trocaico): / - '- '- '-: - '- '- '- /: «Lanse el fiero bruto    con ímpetu salvaje»
Dactylic (dactílico):/ -- ' -- '-: -- ' -- '- /: «La princesa está triste.  ¿Qué tendrá la  princesa?»
Mixed (mixto):        / '-- -- '-: '-- -- '- /: «faga repentina... lida e ilusoria».
 
Ternary (ternario).  A combination of a tridecasílabo ternario (a thirteen-syllable long verse) which may be:
 
a)  Dactílico: / -- '-- '-- '-- '- /:  «Yo palpito tu gloria    mirando sublime».
b)  Compuesto de 7-6: / -'---'-: --'-'- /:  «Hay manos alevosas   que de sus retiros».
c)  Compuesto de 6-7: / - '-- '-: - '- '- '- /: «¿Sus dioses?  El miedo,   las sombras y la muerte».
d)  Ternario: / --- '- -- '- -- '- /:  «En el jardín hay un olor de primavera».
 
With #1-3 above:  «azucena tronchada por un cruel destino, 
rebusca de la dicha, persecución del mal».
 
Alejandrino a la francesa
When the first hemistich (Sp. hemistiquio
half-verse) has (1) an acute termination, 
(2) a synaloepha, or (3) an enjambment
(Eng. "run-on," Sp. encabalgamiento
which ties it to the second hemistich: 
  «En cierta catedral      una campana había 
que sólo se tocaba____algún solemne día 
con el más grave son      y sonoro compás 
cuatro golpes o tres     solía dar no más».
 
Polirítmico: A combination of the verses listed before:
 
Tetradecasílabo trocaico:  / '- '- '-:  '- '- '- '- /: «Soplo de los mares, mensajera del verano».
Tetradecasílabo dactílico:  / '-- '-- '-- '-- '- /:  «Dijo el Centauro, meciendo sus crines hirsutas».
 
ADDENDA:
In addition to the above, there are two common poetic practices to be noted: 
  • METATHESIS (metátesis): the transposition of letters in the third person object pronoun and the plural imperative ending (-ad, -ed, -id): matalde (instead of matadle).  Why?  It's easier on the tongue (remember that poetry was meant to be recited).
  • ASSIMILATION (asimilación):  The /-r/ of the verbal infinitive usually assimilates to the /l/ of an appended pronoun: vello (instead of verlo).  Why?  Because the /l/ and the /r/ are "liquid" or semiconsonants (this occurs at times in, e.g., spoken Japanese or Puerto Rican Spanish).
 
SPANISH STROPHES (alphabetical order):
 
CANCIÓN (Ital. canzone).  Strophic variable combination of seven- and eleven-syllable lines.  Of Italian origin, the canción is the Spanish equivalent of the canzone or Petrarchan ode.  The estancia or estanza (stanza) does not have a fixed structure, and the strophes may be as short as a LIRA or as long as a twenty-line poem.  The rhyme of the first stanza is repeated in the other stanzas,  although the last strophe may be shorter and is called envío
 
ESTROFA (canción):

[first estancia]

  Con un manso rüido
de agua corriente y clara
cerca el Danubio una isla que pudiera
ser lugar escogido
para que descansara
quien, como yo estó agora, no estuviera
do siempre primavera
parece en la verdura
sembrada de las flores
hacen los ruiseñores
renovar el placer o la tristura
con sus blandas querellas
que nunca día ni noche cesar dellas
[ . . . other estancias . . . ]
 

[envío or shorter last stanza]

  Aunque en el agua mueras
canción, no has de quejarte
que yo he mirado bien lo que te toca
menos vida tuvieras
si hubieras de igualarte
con otras que se me han muerto en la boca
Quién tiene culpa desto
allá lo entenderás de mí muy presto
METROS (heptasílabos y endecasílabos):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
 
 
 
 
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
 
 

 

RIMA (consonante) y ESCANSIÓN: 
 
 
 

-ido    a       [capo
-ara    b
-era    C
-ido    a
-ara    b
-era    C ¯|  [verso de enlace: C to c
-era    c  _|  [corpo]
-ura   
-ores   e
-ores   e
-ura    D
-ellas  ¯|   [coda
-ellas  F _| 
 
 
 
 
 

-eras  a         [capo
-arte   b
-oca   C
-eras  a
-arte   b
-oca   C
-esto   d  ¯|  [coda
-esto   D _| 

NB:  A bit more on structure follows:
  • Capo: the first three lines (the capo or "head") of the stanza which do not rhyme with each other (e.g., abC [above]), repeated by three additional lines which rhyme with the first three (e.g., abC; abC in the first stanza above).
  • Corpo: the corpo ("body") starts on the seventh verse (generally a heptasyllable), which rhymes with the last one of the capo, the sixth line (i.e., c to C in the first stanza above).
  • Coda: the "conclusion" or remate of two or three final lines (see above, in the envío, e.g.: dD, or in the coda of the first estancia above, e.g.: fF).
 
CANCIÓN PARALELÍSTICA.  A form used originally in the Galician-Portuguese cantares de amigo of the thirteenth century.  In adapting it to Castilian, Gil Vicente adds the initial estribillo characteristic of the villancico and prefers the octosyllabic meter.  The estribillo is developed in short stanzas (often couplets), each of which closely reflects the sense and syntactical pattern of the previous one: 

 Muy graciosa es la doncella, 
(cómo es bella y hermosa! 
  Digas tú, el marinero 
que en las naves vivías 
si la nave o la vela o la estrella 
es tan bella.
  Digas tú, el caballero 
que las armas vestías, 
si el caballo o las armas o la guerra 
es tan bella.
  Digas tú, el pastorcico 
que el ganadico guardas, 
si el ganado o los valles o la sierra 
es tan bella.
 

 
COPLA.  A short stanza (couplet) composed of short verses of irregular length and no fixed rhyme.  Frequently used as songs: 
 
 
ESTROFA (copla):

Que de noche le mataron 
al caballero
la gala de Medina, 
la flor de Olmedo

METRO (irregular):

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
1 2 3 4 5 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
1 2 3 4 5 

RIMA (asonante) y ESCANSIÓN: 

Ø
e, o
Ø
e, o

 
COPLA REAL.  Two quintillas of different rhyme scheme, but the scheme selected for the first pair remains fixed throughout the series.  Used to express deep emotions: 
 
 
ESTROFA (copla real):

   Ando, señora, estos días
entre tantas asperezas
de imaginaciones mías
consolado en mis tristezas
y triste en mis alegrías
Tengo pensado perderte
imaginación tan fuerte
y así en ella vengo y voy
que me parece que estoy
con las ansias de la muerte

METRO (octosílabo): 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

RIMA (consonante) y ESCANSIÓN: 

-ías    a
-ezas  b
-ías    a
-ezas  b
-ías    a
-erte   c
-erte   c
-oy     d
-oy     d
-erte   c

NB  The copla real is really two QUINTILLAS with independent rhyme.  It is also called a false DÉCIMA.

 
CUADERNA VÍA.  Strophe [estrofa] of French origin consisting of four Alexandrine verses (versos alejandrinos) with a single, consonant rhyme (AAAA).  They are also called versos tetradecasilábicos monorrimos.  This strophe is used only by mester de clerecía (clerical or learned) poets.  It is called cuaderna vía poetry because the strophe consists of 4 (cuatro) lines that use the same full rhyme in all 4 verses. The two heptasyllabic hemistichs (hemistiquios [half-verses]) have a caesura [cesura] or "pause" in the middle.  Why?  Because this is a very long verse and all poetry was recited out loudly (the speaker needs to pause to catch his breath).  Remember that Spanish Alexandrines are 14-syllables long (the French Alexandrines are 12-syllables long).  Why are they called Alexandrine verses?  Because they were originally used in French to recount the heroic deeds of Alexander the Great, one of the greatest generals of all times (the Greek [Macedonian] equivalent of Julius Caesar, the other [Latin] great general and statesman of the classical period). 

Alexander
 
ESTROFA (cuaderna vía):

Cuando la Cruz veía,    yo siempre me humillaba;
me santiguaba siempre,    cuando me la encontraba;
mi amigo, más de cerca    a la Cruz adoraba.
(Traición en tal Cruzada     yo no me recelaba!

METRO (tetradecasílabo): 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7   +   8 9 10 11 12 13 14
1 2 3 4 5 6 7   +   8 9 10 11 12 13 14
1 2 3 4 5 6 7   +   8 9 10 11 12 13 14
1 2 3 4 5 6 7   +   8 9 10 11 12 13 14

RIMA (monorrima consonante): 

-aba    A
-aba    A
-aba    A
-aba    A

The Alexandrine verse appeared for the first time in the Roman d'Alexandre in the thirteenth century.  In the French metrical system it has 12 syllables (dodecasílabos) with four stresses and a marked pause on the hemistich: 

«Que toujours, / dans vos vérs, / / le séns, / coupant les móts» (Boileau).

This form differs from the epic poetry or mester de juglaría poetry ("the art of the jongleur" or juglar in Spanish [juglaría derives from the Latin verb iocari, "to play" {Sp. jugar}). Juglaría poetry consists of stanzas or laisses (Sp. series, tiradas) containing poetic lines of various various syllabic lengths (usually 14 syllables long: 7 in each half-verse or hemistich [Sp. hemistiquio] after a pause or caesura [Sp. cesura]) with assonated rhyme (half rhyme [wherein only the last stressed and unstressed vowels at the end of a line are counted] instead of full rhyme [wherein not only the last stressed and unstressed vowels are counted at the end of a poetic line, but any intervening consonants as well]): 
 


 
 
ESTROFA (juglaresca): 

  Vierais tantas lanzas     hundir y alzar,
tanta adarga     horadar y traspasar,
tanta loriga     romper y desmallar,
tantos pendones blancos     rojos de sangre quedar,
tantos caballos briosos     sin sus dueños andar.
Los moros gritan «¡Mahoma!»;    «¡Santiago!» la cristiandad.
Van cayendo por el campo   en un poco de lugar
muchos moros muertos:   mil trescientos ya.
 
 

 

METRO (irregular): 

RIMA (asonante): 

-a   A
-a   A
-a   A
-a   A
-a   A
-a   A
-a   A
-a   A
 
 

 

 
CUARTETO.  A quatrain, or group of four hendecasyllables, rhyming ABAB or ABBA
 
 
ESTROFA (cuarteto):

   Un pastorcico solo está penado
ajeno de placer y de contento
y en su pastora puesto el pensamiento
y el pecho del amor muy lastimado

METRO (endecasílabo): 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

RIMA (consonante) y ESCANSIÓN: 

-ado   A
-ento  B
-ento  B
-ado   A

 
DÉCIMA (or espinela, named after the poet Vicente Espinel [1550-1624]).  It consists of ten octosyllabic lines rhyming: abbaaccddc. Décimas are used for plaintive speeches: 
 
ESTROFA (décima):

    Déme los pies vuestra alteza
si puedo de tanto sol
tocar, ¡oh rayo español!, 
la majestad y grandeza
Con alegría y tristeza
hoy a vuestras plantas llego
y mi aliento, lince y ciego
entre asombros y desmayos
es águila a tantos rayos
mariposa a tanto fuego

METRO (octosílabo): 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

RIMA (consonante) y ESCANSIÓN: 

-eza    a
-ol      b
-ol      b
-eza    a
-eza    a
-ego    c
-ego    c
-ayos  d
-ayos  d
-ego    c

 
GLOSA.  A poem consisting of an initial theme and a series of stanzas which comment on it and repeat its lines one by one.  The commonest type of glosa consists of an opening redondilla, followed by four stanzas of ten lines or less, each of which incorporates a line of the redondilla

              [redondilla
  Va y viene mi pensamiento         a
como el mar seguro y manso;       b
¿cuándo tendrá algún descanso   b
tan continuo movimiento?            a

               [glosa
  Parte el pensamiento mío 
cargado de mil dolores, 
y vuélveme con mayores 
de la parte do le envío. 
  Aunque desto en la memoria 
se engendra tanto contento, 
que con tan dulce tormento, 
cargado de pena y gloria, 
va y viene mi pensamiento.
  Como el mar muy sosegado 
se regala con la calma, 
así se regala el alma 
con tan dichoso cuidado. 
 Mas allí mudanza alguna 
no puede haber, pues descanso 
con el mal que me importuna, 
que no es sujeto a fortuna, 
como el mar seguro y manso.
  Si el cielo se muestra airado, 
la mar luego se embravece, 
y mientras el mar más crece, 
está más firme en su estado. 
  Ni a mí me cansa el penar, 
ni yo con el mal me canso; 
si algo me podrá cansar, 
es venir a imaginar 
cuándo tendrá algún descanso.
  Que aunque en el más firme amor 
mil mudanzas puede haber, 
como es de pena a placer 
y de descanso a dolor, 
  sólo en mí está reservado 
en tan fijo y firme asiento; 
que sin poder ser mudado, 
está quedo y sosegado 
tan continuo movimiento.
 

 
LETRILLA, a lyrical composition, often humorous and sarcastic, consisiting of poetic lines of eight or six syllables, which adopts the form of the villancico or romance or redondilla with estribillo.  The estribillo (refrain) may be quite flexible, consisting of a few or many lines.  Each strophe or mudanza leads back to the refrain: 
 
 
ESTROFA (letrilla): 
[estribillo]
   Poderoso caballero
es don Dinero

[mudanza (redondilla)]

Madre, yo al oro me humillo
él es mi amante y mi amado
pues de puro enamorado
anda contino amarillo
que pues doblón o sencillo
hace todo cuanto quiero
poderoso caballero
es don Dinero
METRO (octosílabo o hexasílabo): 
 
 

irregular

Quevedo


 

RIMA (consonante) y ESCANSIÓN: 
 
 
 

-ero    c
-ero    c
 

-illo    a
-ado    b
-ado    b
-illo     a¬
-illo     a- verso de enlace (a a a
-ero      c verso de vuelta  (c a c
-ero      a estribillo
-ero      a

 
LIRA.  Six poetic lines of seven- and eleven-syllable lines, with three rhymes, i.e., aBaBcC.  It may also have five verses and rhyme aBabB.  Of Italian origin.  Used in the same way SILVAS are used: 
 
 
ESTROFA (lira):

   Vivir quiero conmigo
gozar quiero del bien que debo al cielo
a solas, sin testigo
libre de amor, de celo
de odio, de esperanzas, de recelo

METROS (endecasílabos y heptasílabos):

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

RIMA (consonante) y ESCANSIÓN: 

-igo    a
-elo    B
-igo    a
-elo    b
-elo    B

 
MADRIGAL.  A short composition in the Italianate manner, intended for musical performance and consisting of a free combination of eleven- and seven-syllable lines.  Etymologically, the Italian word madrigale (1588) derives from Latin matricalis (simple) > mater (mother) > of the womb > uncomplicated): 
 
 
ESTROFA (madrigal):

    Ojos claros, serenos
si de un dulce mirar sois alabados
¿por qué, si mi miráis, miráis airados
Si cuanto más piadosos
más bellos parecéis a aquel que os mira
no mi miréis con ira
porque no parezcáis menos hermosos
(Ay, tormentos rabiosos
Ojos claros, serenos,
ya que así me miráis, miradme al menos

METROS (heptasílabos y endecasílabos):
 
 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
RIMA (consonante) y ESCANSIÓN: 

-enos   a
-ados   B
-ados   B
-osos   c
-ira      D
-ira      d
-osos   C
-osos   c
-enos   a
-enos   A

 
OCTAVA REAL (Italian ottava rima).  Eight hendecasyllables rhyming ABABABCC.  Used for narration of important events: 
 
ESTROFA (octava real):

   Cerca del Tajo en soledad amena,
de verdes sauces hay una espesura
toda de hiedra revestida y llena
que por el tronco va hasta el altura
y así la teje arriva y encadena
que el sol no halla paso a la verdura
el agua baña el prado con sonido
alegrando la hierba y el oído.

METRO (endecasílabo): 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

RIMA  (consonante) y ESCANSIÓN: 

-ena   A
-ura    B
-ena   A
-ura    B
-ena   A
-ura    B
-ido    C
-ído    C

NB: Giovanni Boccaccio first used ottava rima in 1341. 

 
QUINTILLA.  Strophe (estrofa) of five octosyllables with two rhymes.  The most common rhyme scheme is ababa, but any combination is possible (i.e., abbab, abaab, etc.) provided that not more than two lines with the same rhyme come in succession.  They are used to express deep emotions: 
 
ESTROFA (quintilla): 
 

Catalinón:       Todo en mal estado está.
Don Juan:   ¿Cómo? 
Catalinón:                   Que Octavio ha sabido
                     la traición de Italia ya,
                     y el de la Mota, ofendido
                     de ti, justas quejas da;
 

METRO (octosílabo):
 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

 
RIMA (consonante) y ESCANSIÓN:
-a         a

-ido      b
-a         a
-ido      b
-a         a

 

NB:  Note in the dramatic sample above that the second and third line form one complete octosyllabic line, even though the line is shared by two speakers (Don Juan and Catalinón).  This "sharing" of lines by different speakers (at times by as many as three or four speakers) gives the impression of swiftness. Each "section" is called a stichomythia (Sp. esticomitia).  It differs from a hemistich, which encompasses half a verse, not necessarily "shared" by different speakers.  Notice also the combination of assonant and consonant rhymes (/a/ and /ido/) and the acute (masculine [oxytonic]) and grave (feminine [paroxytonic]) endings in this particular sample.

 
REDONDILLA.  A quatrain (cuarteta) of octosyllables with consonantal or full rhyme (rima consonante) [abba, cddc, etc.], that is, rhyme not only of vowels but of consonants as well, at the end of each poetic line [NB: for verses less than ten syllables long use small letters to define the scansion {escansión} <i.e., abba>; otherwise, use capital letters].  There are two kinds of redondillas: redondillas abrazadas (abba) and redondillas cruzadas (abab). Redondillas are used for scenes of animated conversation: love scenes, quarrels, etc.: 
 
ESTROFA (redondilla):

   Va y viene mi pensamiento
como el mar seguro y manso
¿cuándo tendrá algún descanso
tan continuo movimiento

METRO (octosílabo): 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

RIMA (consonante) y ESCANSIÓN:

-ento   a
-anso   b
-anso   b
-ento   a

 
ROMANCE.  An indefinite series (tirada) of octosyllabic verses (versos octosilábicos [octosílabos]) with assonance (asonancia) in the even lines (versos pares).  Used for narration, description, exposition, and ordinary conversation: 
 
ESTROFA (romance):

   Por la tarde salió Inés 
a la feria de Medina
tan hermosa que la gente 
pensaba que amanecía

METRO (octosílabo): 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

RIMA (asonante) y ESCANSIÓN:

Ø
i, a
Ø
i, a

 
ROMANCILLO.  Has the same pattern of assonance as romance but it is composed of six [hexasílabos] or seven [heptasílabos] syllable lines: 
 
ESTROFA (romancillo):

   Sale el mayo hermoso 
con los frescos vientos, 
que le ha dado marzo, 
de céfiros bellos . . .

METRO (octosílabo): 

12 3 4 5 6 
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 2 3 4 5 6 
1 2 3 4 5 6

RIMA (asonante): 

Ø 
e, o
Ø
e, o

 
SEGUIDILLA.  A form of dance-song, of medieval origin.  In the seventeenth century, it usually consists of a four-line stanza or copla, with assonance or full rhyme in the even-numbered lines.  Its chief characteristic lies in the combination of two different line-lengths: 7-5-7-5 and 7-6-7-6 are among the most common: 
 

 

ESTROFA (seguidilla):

   Por un sevillano 
rufo a lo valón
tengo socarrado 
todo el corazón
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

METRO (irregular): 

 

RIMA (irregular) y ESCANSIÓN: 

Ø 
-ón
Ø
-ón
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
SILVA.  A laisse (Sp. tirada) consisting of eleven- and seven-syllable lines (hendecasyllables [endecasílabos] and heptasyllables [heptasílabos]), the majority of which are rhymed although there is no fixed order or rhyme nor is there a fixed number of lines. Silvas are used by persons of high rank, usually in soliloquies, and for highly emotional narration and description.  Of Italian origin.Cf. LIRA above: 
 
ESTROFA (silva): 

Levanta entre gemidos, alma mía,
el grito afectuoso,
pidiendo amor, pues Dios te lo ha mandado,
(oh mi esperanza, oh gloria, oh mi alegría,
oh mi Esposo gentil, oh dulce Esposo,
querido mío, amante regalado,
más florido que el prado! . . .

METRO (heptasílabos / endecasílabos):

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

RIMA (consonante) y ESCANSIÓN: 

-ía        A
-oso      b
-ado     C
-ía        A
-oso      B
-ado      C
-ado      c 

There are four silva types: 
1.  Silva de consonantes (aAbBcCdD). 
2.  Seven- and eleven-syllable lines mixed irregularly and with some lines unrhymed. 
3.  All eleven-syllable lines, the majority rhymed, but in no fixed order. 
4.  Seven- and eleven-syllable lines mixed irregularly but all rhymes are in pairs. 
 

 
SONETO (sonnet).  Of Italian origin.  It is composed of two quatrains (cuartetos) of hendecasyllables (ABBA; ABBA) and two tercets (tercetos) of hendecasyllables (CDC; DCD).  A sonnet develops a single theme in a very concise way and is often used for monologues and for exchange of vows of love.  The tercets may have the following combinations: CDC; DCD, CDC; CDC, CDD; DCC, CDE; CDE, CDE; DCE, CDE; DEC, CDEEDC
 
ESTROFA (soneto):

   Un soneto me manda hacer Violante
que en mi vida me he visto en tanto aprieto
catorce versos dicen que es soneto
burla burlando van los tres delante
  Yo pensé que no hallara consonante
y estoy a la mitad de otro cuarteto
mas si me veo en el primer terceto
no hay cosa en los cuartetos que me espante
  Por el primer terceto voy entrando
y parece que entré con pie derecho
pues fin con este verso le voy dando
   Ya estoy en el segundo, y aun sospecho
que voy los trece versos acabando;
contad si son catorce, está hecho

METRO (endecasílabo): 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

RIMA (consonante) y ESCANSIÓN: 

-ante     A
-eto       B
-eto       B
-ante      A
-ante      A
-eto        B
-eto        B
-ante      A
-ando     C
-echo     D
-ando     C
-echo     D
-ando     C
-echo     D

NB:  The poet Petrarch perfected the sonnet in Italian in the 14th century.  Garcilaso perfected the sonnet in Spanish in the 16th century. 
 

Petrarch

Garcilaso

 
TERCETOS.  (Italian terza rima) A series of stanzas of three hendecasyllables, the first rhyming ABA, the second BCB, the third CDC, etc.  They end usually with a quatrain (YZYZ).  They are used for serious expositions, for speeches of royalty, for monologues and emotional dialogues: 
 
ESTROFA (tercetos): 

   La codicia en las manos de la suerte
se arroja al mar, la ira a las espadas
y la ambición se ríe de la muerte
   Y ¿no serán siquiera tan osadas
las opuestas acciones, si las miro
de más nobles objetos ayudadas?

[ . . . ]

   Ya, dulce amigo, huyo y me retiro
de cuanto simple amé: rompí los lazos
ven y sabrás al grande fin que aspiro
antes que el tiempo muera en nuestros brazos

METRO (endecasílabo): 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

[ . . . ] 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

RIMA (consonante) y ESCANSIÓN: 

-erte    A
-adas   B
-erte    A
-adas   B
-iro      C
-adas   B

[ . . . ] 

-iro      Y
-azos    Z
-iro      Y
-azos    Z

NB:  Dante Alighieri composed the Commedia in terza rima (in recollection of the Trinity). 
Dante
 
VERSO SUELTO (blank verse).  Hendecasyllables without rhyme.  Used in the same way SILVAS are used.
 
VERSO PAREADO.  Hendecasyllables rhyming in pairs: AABBCC, etc.  Used in the same way SILVASare used.
 
VILLANCICO.  Song in eight- or six-syllable lines.  It has an estribillo or theme stanza of two to four lines which is developed in a series of longer stanzas (often redondillas), each of which leads back to the original estribillo or refrain. Estribillo = villancico.  The larger strophes are called mudanzas (variations): 
 
ESTROFA (villancico): 

[cancioncilla inicial]
   Míos fueron, mi corazón, 
los vuestros ojos morenos
¿Quién los hizo ser ajenos

[mudanza (redondilla)]
   Míos fueron, desconocida
los ojos con que miráis
y si mirando matáis
con miraros dais la vida

   No seais desconocida
no me los hagáis ajenos
los vuestros ojos morenos.

METRO (octosílabo o hexasílabo): 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
RIMA (consonante) y ESCANSIÓN: 
 

-enos  c--------
-enos  c-----   |
                  |   |
-ida    a      |   |
-áis    b      |   |
-áis    b      |   |
-ida    a--   |   |
               |   |
-ida    a--   |   | verso de enlace (a a a
-enos  c-----   | verso de vuelta (c to c
-enos  c-------- estribillo
 
ZÉJEL.  A metrical form of Mozarabic origin, similar to the villancico, but distinguished by its central unit of three lines with identical rhyme, followed by a fourth line which rhymes with the estribillo: aa (estribillo): bbba: aa (repetition of the estribillo).  This basic pattern admits of a number of variations, principally in the length of the estribillo, which is not always repeated in full: 
 
ESTROFA (zéjel): 

[estribillo]

   Ojos garzos ha la niña
¿quién ge los namoraría?

   Son tan bellos y tan vivos
que a todos tienen cativos
mas muéstralos tan esquivos
que roban el alegría

   No te tardes que me muero
carcelero
no te tardes que me muero

   Apresura tu venida
porque no pierda la vida
que la fe no está perdida
Carcelero
no te tardes que me muero

METRO (irregular):
 
 






























 

RIMA (consonante): 
 
 
 

i, a        a
-ía         a
                                           | 
-ivos      b
-ivos      b
-ivos      b
-ía         a

-ero        c
-ero        c
-ero        c

-ida        d
-ida        d
-ida        d
-ero        c
-ero        c


Addendum:


EL RITMO DE LOS VERSOS ENDECASÍLABOS EN ESPAÑOL:
 
Enfático (1, 6, 10): / '---- '--- '- /: «Eres la primavera verdadera»
Heroico (yámbico) <ambulante> [2, 6, 10]: / - '--- '--- '- /: «Aquella voluntad honesta y pura»
Melódico (3, 6, 10): / -- ' -- '--- '- /: «Y en reposo silente sobre el ara»
Sáfico <majestuoso> (4, 8, 10): / --- ' --- '- '- /: «Dulce vecina de la verde selva»
Dactílico (anapéstico) [4, 7, 10]: / --- '-- '-- '- /: «Libre la frente que el casco rehusa» 
Galaico antiguo (5, 10): / ----'----'- /: «Cosas misteriosas, trágicas, raras»
Endecasílabo a la francesa (4[terminación aguda], 6 [u 8], 10): / ---'-'---'- / o / ---'---'-'- /: «No, no das consuelo a mi quebranto»
Polirrítmico / <peán> (e.g., 4 [terminación grave], 6, 10): / ---'- '---'- / «No las francesas armas odïosas» 
EL RITMO DEL ENDECASÍLABO EN TODAS SUS POSIBILIDADES EXISTENTES:
 
 
RITMO HEROICO ( 2 / 6 ):

2-10
6-10
2-6-10
2-8-10
4-6-10
5-6-10
6-7-10
6-8-10
1-2-6-10
2-3-6-10
2-5-6-10
2-6-7-10
2-6-8-10
2-6-9-10
4-6-7-10
4-6-8-10
4-6-9-10
5-6-8-10
6-7-9-10
1-2-5-6-10
1-2-6-7-10
1-2-6-8-10
2-3-4-6-10
2-3-6-7-10
2-3-6-8-10
2-3-6-9-10
2-4-5-6-10
2-4-6-7-10
2-4-6-9-10
2-5-6-7-10
2-5-6-8-10
2-5-6-9-10
2-6-7-8-10
2-6-7-9-10
2-6-8-9-10
4-6-7-9-10
5-6-7-8-10
1-2-3-6-7-10
1-2-4-6-9-10
1-2-5-6-9-10
1-2-6-7-8-10
1-2-6-7-9-10
2-3-4-6-8-10
2-3-5-6-7-10
2-3-6-7-8-10
2-3-6-7-9-10
2-3-6-8-9-10
2-4-5-6-8-10
2-4-6-7-8-10
2-4-6-8-9-10
4-5-6-8-9-10
1-2-3-6-7-8-10
1-2-4-5-6-9-10
1-2-4-6-8-9-10
2-3-4-6-7-8-10
2-4-5-6-7-8-10

RITMO SÁFICO ( 4 ):

4-10
1-4-10
2-4-10
3-4-10
4-8-10
1-2-4-10
1-4-5-10
1-4-6-10
1-4-8-10
2-4-6-10
2-4-8-10
2-4-9-10
3-4-8-10
4-5-6-10
4-5-8-10
4-8-9-10
1-2-4-6-10
1-2-4-8-10
1-3-4-6-10
1-3-4-8-10
1-4-5-6-10
1-4-5-8-10
1-4-8-9-10
2-3-4-8-10
2-4-5-8-10
2-4-6-8-10
2-4-8-9-10
3-4-6-8-10
4-5-6-8-10
1-2-3-4-8-10
1-2-4-5-6-10
1-2-4-6-7-10
1-2-4-6-8-10
1-2-4-8-9-10
1-3-4-5-6-10
1-3-4-6-7-10
1-3-4-6-8-10
1-4-5-6-9-10
2-3-4-5-6-10
2-3-4-5-8-10
2-3-4-8-9-10
2-4-5-8-9-10
3-4-6-8-9-10
1-2-3-4-5-8-10
1-2-3-4-6-8-10
1-2-4-6-7-8-10
1-2-3-4-5-8-9-10
 

 

RITMO MELÓDICO ( 3 ):

3-10
3-6-10
3-8-10
3-9-10
1-3-6-10
3-4-6-10
3-5-6-10
3-6-7-10
3-6-8-10
3-6-9-10
3-7-8-10
1-2-3-6-10
1-3-5-6-10
1-3-5-8-10
1-3-6-7-10
1-3-6-8-10
2-3-5-6-10
3-4-6-7-10
3-4-6-9-10
3-5-6-8-10
3-6-7-8-10
3-6-7-9-10
1-2-3-4-6-10
1-2-3-5-6-10
1-3-5-6-8-10
1-3-6-7-9-10
1-3-6-8-9-10
3-4-5-6-9-10
1-3-4-5-6-7-10
1-3-5-6-8-9-10
2-3-4-6-8-9-10
3-4-6-7-8-9-10
 

RITMO ENFÁTICO ( 1 ):

1-6-10
1-6-8-10
1-6-9-10
1-4-6-7-10
1-4-6-8-10
1-4-6-9-10
1-6-7-9-10
1-2-3-6-8-10
1-3-6-7-8-10
1-4-6-7-8-10
1-4-6-7-9-10
1-4-6-7-8-9-10
1-2-3-4-6-7-8-9-10
 

RITMO DACTÍLICO ( 7 ):

4-7-10
1-4-7-10
2-4-7-10
3-4-7-10
4-5-7-10
4-7-8-10
4-7-9-10
1-2-4-7-10
1-3-4-7-10
1-4-5-7-10
1-4-6-7-10
1-4-7-8-10
2-3-4-7-10
2-4-5-7-10
2-4-7-8-10
4-5-6-7-10
4-7-8-9-10
1-2-4-5-7-10
1-2-4-7-8-10
1-4-5-7-8-10

EL RITMO DEL ENDECASÍLABO EN TODAS SUS POSIBILIDADES EXISTENTES:
 
 
RITMO HEROICO( 2 / 6 ):

1-2-3-6-7-8-10
1-2-3-6-7-10
1-2-4-5-6-9-10
1-2-4-6-8-9-10
1-2-4-6-9-10
1-2-5-6-9-10
1-2-5-6-10
1-2-6-7-8-10
1-2-6-7-9-10
1-2-6-7-10
1-2-6-8-10
1-2-6-10

2-3-4-6-7-8-10
2-3-4-6-8-10
2-3-4-6-10
2-3-5-6-7-10
2-3-6-7-8-10
2-3-6-7-9-10
2-3-6-7-10
2-3-6-8-9-10
2-3-6-8-10
2-3-6-9-10
2-3-6-10
2-4-5-6-7-8-10
2-4-5-6-8-10
2-4-5-6-10
2-4-6-7-8-10
2-4-6-7-10
2-4-6-8-9-10
2-4-6-9-10
2-5-6-7-10
2-5-6-8-10
2-5-6-9-10
2-5-6-10
2-6-7-8-10
2-6-7-9-10
2-6-7-10
2-6-8-9-10
2-6-8-10
2-6-9-10
2-6-10
2-8-10
2-10

4-5-6-8-9-10
4-6-7-9-10
4-6-7-10
4-6-8-10
4-6-9-10
4-6-10

5-6-7-8-10
5-6-8-10
5-6-10

6-7-9-10
6-7-10
6-8-10
6-10

RITMO SÁFICO ( 4 ):

1-2-3-4-5-8-9-10
1-2-3-4-5-8-10
1-2-3-4-6-8-10
1-2-3-4-8-10
1-2-4-5-6-10
1-2-4-6-7-8-10
1-2-4-6-7-10
1-2-4-6-8-10
1-2-4-6-10
1-2-4-8-9-10
1-2-4-8-10
1-2-4-10
1-3-4-5-6-10
1-3-4-6-7-10
1-3-4-6-8-10
1-3-4-6-10
1-3-4-8-10
1-4-5-6-9-10
1-4-5-6-10
1-4-5-8-10
1-4-5-10
1-4-6-10
1-4-8-9-10
1-4-8-10
1-4-10

2-3-4-5-6-10
2-3-4-5-8-10
2-3-4-8-9-10
2-3-4-8-10
2-4-5-8-9-10
2-4-5-8-10
2-4-6-8-10
2-4-6-10
2-4-8-9-10
2-4-8-10
2-4-9-10
2-4-10

3-4-6-8-9-10
3-4-6-8-10
3-4-8-10
3-4-10

4-5-6-8-10
4-5-6-10
4-5-8-10
4-8-9-10
4-8-10
4-10
 
 
 
 
 

 

RITMO MELÓDICO ( 3 ):

1-2-3-4-6-10
1-2-3-5-6-10
1-2-3-6-10
1-3-4-5-6-7-10
1-3-5-6-8-9-10
1-3-5-6-8-10
1-3-5-6-10
1-3-5-8-10
1-3-6-7-9-10
1-3-6-7-10
1-3-6-8-9-10
1-3-6-8-10
1-3-6-10

2-3-4-6-8-9-10
2-3-5-6-10

3-4-5-6-9-10
3-4-6-7-8-9-10
3-4-6-7-10
3-4-6-9-10
3-4-6-10
3-5-6-8-10
3-5-6-10
3-6-7-8-10
3-6-7-9-10
3-6-7-10
3-6-8-10
3-6-9-10
3-6-10
3-7-8-10
3-8-10
3-9-10
3-10
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

RITMO ENFÁTICO ( 1 ):

1-2-3-4-6-7-8-9-10
1-2-3-6-8-10
1-3-6-7-8-10
1-4-6-7-8-9-10
1-4-6-7-8-10
1-4-6-7-9-10
1-4-6-7-10
1-4-6-8-10
1-4-6-9-10
1-6-7-9-10
1-6-8-10
1-6-9-10
1-6-10
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

RITMO DACTÍLICO ( 7 ):

1-2-4-5-7-10
1-2-4-7-8-10
1-2-4-7-10
1-3-4-7-10
1-4-5-7-8-10
1-4-5-7-10
1-4-6-7-10
1-4-7-8-10
1-4-7-10

2-3-4-7-10
2-4-5-7-10
2-4-7-8-10
2-4-7-10

3-4-7-10

4-5-6-7-10
4-5-7-10
4-7-8-9-10
4-7-8-10
4-7-9-10
4-7-10
 
 
 
 

 


End
 
Created on 25 January 2002 by
A. Robert Lauer

arlauer@ou.edu
Last revised on: 
29 Jan. 2013