Daphnia attack
Rock bluff near a pond
Polar bear
Sampling on the lake
WEIDER HOME
PAGE
RECENT GRANTS
SELECTED PUBLICATIONS
RESEARCH TRIP PHOTOS
OU
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY
BIOLOGICAL STATION

Lawrence J. Weider

Cape Hooper - Baffin Isle - Zodiak group shot

Larry, Lars-Anders, Marko Cape Bathhurst TNW'99 zoops

Lawrence J. Weider
ljweider@ou.edu

Professor, Department of Biology, University of Oklahoma

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

RESEARCH STAFF

Daphnia pulex

 

 Curriculum Vitae in pdf format
                                                    

Lawrence J. Weider received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Ecology, Ethology, and Evolution in 1984. Dr. Weider accepted the position as Director of Research in January 1999 after more than eight years at the Max-Planck-Institut für Limnologie, Plön, Germany. Effective 1 January 2000 he was appointed as the Director of the Biological Station, and he served in this capacity for 12 1/2 years, stepping down in June 2012.

Research Interests:

Evolutionary ecology, population/ecological genetics, population ecology, physiological ecology, aquatic ecology, arctic ecology, life-history evolution, metapopulational dynamics, and conservation ecology.

Current Research Activities:

My research interests center on studying the mechanisms (e.g. selection, migration) that influence the maintenance of genetic diversity in asexual-sexual species complexes, using the freshwater cladoceran genus, Daphnia, as my primary model organism. My lab employs a variety of molecular (e.g. allozymes, mtDNA RFLPs, DNA sequencing) and ecological (e.g. life-table, selection experiments) techniques to examine how spatial and temporal environmental heterogeneity influence levels of genetic variation in natural populations. Recent and current projects include: (i) a circumarctic analysis of the phylogeography and phylogenetics of the Daphnia pulex complex; (ii) examining the role that sediment egg banks of freshwater zooplankton play, as repositories of long-term (i.e. decades, centuries) genetic and ecological information; (iii) delving into the relationship between elemental composition (biological stoichiometry – C:N:P), ribosomal (r)DNA structure, growth rates, and selection, using the freshwater microcrustacean, Daphnia, as our model organism; (iv) ecology and genetics of invasive exotic species, primarily aquatic species such as the subtropical zooplankter, Daphnia lumholtzi; (v) metapopulations and ecological genomics in sub-arctic Daphnia.

I have a modern, well-equipped laboratory located at the Biological Station, an approximately two hr drive south of the OU main campus on the north shore of Lake Texoma, as well as lab space on the main OU campus.  Shared space is also available in a central "Molecular Ecology" laboratory in the Department of Zoology, which houses a variety of equipment for molecular ecology/evolution studies, including an ABI 16-capillary DNA analyzer.  I am also a member of the core Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) faculty, an inter-departmental Ph.D. program. For those students who might be interested in doing graduate work or undergraduate research projects, please contact me at:

ljweider@ou.edu.   

Laura Harolds

 

Larry, Richard and Donna